Calculating Interaction Rate

The Interaction Rate (also referred to as “I-Rate”) allows you to see how profiles perform based on interactions the profiles’ posts earned relative to their size. This allows for comparison between smaller and larger pages alike. Looking at the single Interaction Rate of a profile might not tell an interesting story, but if you compare it to the Interaction Rates of competitors, you can really see which profiles are posting more successful and engaging content.

At a page level, this index takes into account the amount of interactions, divided by the number of posts created in the selected timeframe and then divided again by the profile’s average fans to get a normalized number. So if the number of fans was 10 at the beginning and 30 at the end of the selected time period, the fan count used to determine the Interaction Rate would be 20.

It is also important to note that the interactions counted in these metrics are based on the create time of the interacted-with post and not the time the interaction occurred. That means if there are 0 posts in the selected timeframe, then the Interaction Rate will be 0.

At a post level, this index takes into account the amount of interactions divided by the profile’s followers when the post was created.

EXCEPTIONS: 
Facebook Insights Interaction Rate is an exception to these page and post level calculations.
YouTube Interaction Rate is an exception to these page level calculations.

Below are the formulas we use to calculate our different Interaction Rates within the tool on both page and post level. ‘#’ represents ‘number’.

Page Level Interaction Rates

Facebook - Public Data

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.45.19 PM.png

Reactions: Likes + Love + Wow + Haha + Sad + Angry

Note: Facebook’s API only makes public the interactions on post but not on shares of the post. This means e.g. if a post received a total of 5 reactions (3 on the post, 2 on shares of the post) 4 comments (2 on the post, 2 on shares of the post) and 2 shares (1 on the post, 1 on a share of the post) we would say total interactions = 6, not 11.

Example

Reactions: 150 | Comments: 30 | Shares: 10 |

Posts: 2 | Fans (start): 800 | Fans (end): 1,000

Interaction Rate = 10.5556%

Facebook - Insights Data

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.45.12 PM.png

Engaged Users: The # of people who engaged with the page. Engagements include any click.

Reach: The # of people who saw any content associated with the page. Reach is equivalent to unique impressions.

Note: Unlike public data which is based on the create time of the interacted-with post, Insights Interaction Rate is based on the time of the engagement.

Example

Engaged Users: 150 | Reach: 1,800

Interaction Rate = 8.3333%

Twitter

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.35.56 PM.png

Own Tweets: These are tweets posted by the account that are not retweets or replies. This differs from the Tweets column in the Key Metrics Table as Tweets = Own Tweets + Retweeted Tweets + Replies. Interaction Rate is calculated only using Own Tweets.

Note: This also means that the likes, retweets and replies in the calculation are only from the account’s Own Tweets. The reason we show ‘n/a’ for the Interaction Rate of Retweeted Tweets is because the interactions values we get for a Retweeted Tweet are from the original tweet, while the followers value is of the account you are analyzing that retweeted it, so these shouldn’t be combined in the same calculation.

Example

Likes: 150 | Retweets: 30 | Replies: 10 |

Tweets: 2 | Followers (start): 800 | Followers (end): 1,000

Interaction Rate = 10.5556%

Instagram

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.35.50 PM.png

Example

Likes: 150 | Comments: 40

Posts: 2 | Followers (start): 800 | Followers (end): 1,000

Interaction Rate = 10.5556%

LinkedIn

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.36.31 PM.png

Example

Likes: 150 | Comments: 40

Updates: 2 | Followers (start): 800 | Followers (end): 1,000

Interaction Rate = 10.5556%

YouTube 

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.36.08 PM.png

Example

Likes: 150 | Dislikes: 5 | Comments: 35

Subscribers (start): 800 | Subscribers (end): 1,000

Interaction Rate = 21.1111%

Post Level Interaction Rates

Facebook - Public Data

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.35.25 PM.png

Reactions: Likes + Love + Wow + Haha + Sad + Angry

Note: Facebook’s API only makes public the interactions on post but not on shares of the post. This means e.g. if a post received a total of 5 reactions (3 on the post, 2 on shares of the post) 4 comments (2 on the post, 2 on shares of the post) and 2 shares (1 on the post, 1 on a share of the post) we would say total interactions = 6, not 11.

Example

Reactions: 90 | Comments: 10 | Shares: 5 | Fans: 900

Interaction Rate = 11.6667%

Facebook - Insights Data

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.45.12 PM.png

Engaged Users: The unique # of people who engaged with the post. Engagements include any click.

Reach: The # of people who saw the post. Reach is equivalent to unique impressions.

Example

Engaged Users: 150 | Reach: 1,800

Interaction Rate = 8.3333%

Twitter

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.36.01 PM.png

Example

Likes: 90 | Retweets: 10 | Replies: 5 | Followers: 900

Interaction Rate = 11.6667%

Note: Interaction Rate is only calculated for Own Tweets and not for Retweeted Tweets. Retweeted Tweets will always show ‘n/a’ for Interaction Rate. This is because the interactions values we get for a Retweeted Tweet are from the original tweet, while the followers value is of the account you are analyzing that retweeted it, so this wouldn’t accurate to compare to the Interaction Rate for the Own Tweets.  

Instagram

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.48.59 PM.png

Example

Likes: 90 | Comments: 15 | Followers: 900

Interaction Rate = 11.6667%

LinkedIn

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.35.44 PM.png

Example

Likes: 90 | Comments: 15 | Followers: 900

Interaction Rate = 11.6667%

YouTube

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.36.15 PM.png

Example

Likes: 90 | Dislikes: 2 | Comments: 13 | Subscribers: 900

Interaction Rate = 11.6667%

FAQs

Why do you use average followers at page level?

The reason we use an average value is because, more often than not, the number of followers the profile has at the beginning of the analyzed timeframe and the end has changed. In order to try to get a value most accurate to the changing follower count, we average the number of followers on the start date of the analysis and the end date.

Why do you not divide by videos for the YouTube page level calculation?

Unlike the other networks, In YouTube we don’t have a timeline approach but rather a search based approach. For example, even videos that are 2 years old will still be watched and receive interactions. Whereas on Twitter, a Tweet that is older than a few hours basically doesn’t exist anymore. That’s why we don’t divide by the videos count. For the other networks we divide by the number of posts that were posted in the selected period, but since on YouTube the interactions can come from all videos, it wouldn’t make sense.

Why is my Interaction Rate ‘n/a’ even though there’s interaction data?

The calculation for Interaction Rate actually requires both Interaction Data and Audience Data. Because of this, if there is no Audience Data on a given date (meaning there’s no follower value for that day), then the equation would be dividing by 0 which is not possible. Therefore, an Interaction Rate will only show once Audience Data is available.You can learn more about Audience and Interaction Data here.

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